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June 26, 2014

Rescue, Rehab and Release

The animal care team at our affiliated Fund for Animals Wildlife Center in Ramona, California, last year took in a red-tailed hawk who’d been found at a trolley station. Her wing was heavily damaged, after coming out on the losing end of a collision with a mechanized vehicle or an overhead power line. Trolley Girl, as she came to be known, had surgery on her wing and burned feathers removed. She lost a lot of muscle strength, but over time and with proper care she was declared fit for flight exercises in March and expect that she is now counting down the days until released into the wild.

Trolley Girl is just one of about 15,000 creatures every year who come, broken, into our wildlife rehabilitation centers where our staff and volunteers work tirelessly to mend their wounds and broken bodies and to give them a second chance at life in the wild.

FOX_KITS
These orphaned red fox kits are being cared for at the Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable, Massachusetts.
Photo: Heather Fone/The HSUS

It’s something that happens not only at our facilities, but at hundreds of other wildlife rehabilitation centers quietly but critically operating in communities throughout the nation.  That’s why I am so pleased that Representative Lamar Smith (R-Texas) and 11 cosponsors introduced a resolution today (H. Res. 651) in the U.S. House of Representatives to recognize the importance of wildlife rehabilitation and the dedicated individuals who devote their lives and expertise to it. 

Wildlife rehabilitation has probably been around as long as kids have been bringing orphaned baby animals home and asking moms and dads how to care for them. But over time, the needs in this sector have increased as wild animals face increasing peril from roads, power lines, glass windows, poisons, wind turbines and other human-made constructs and hazards.

The quality of the centers focusing on these concerns has risen to meet these demands and today we have increasingly sophisticated and specialized facilities staffed by specialists – veterinarians, administrators, husbandry experts and even nutritionists in some cases. These facilities have broadened the mission of rehabilitation and they often serve as early warning centers to monitor the health and status of our wildlife communities.

TORTOISE_STRAWBERRY
A red-footed tortoise enjoys a strawberry at the South Florida Wildlife Center in Fort Lauderdale.
Photo: Amber McPherson/The HSUS

The three wildlife rehabilitation centers operated by The HSUS and its affiliates, located in California, Florida, and Massachusetts, see animals ranging from baby birds and squirrels and opossums to bald eagles and mountain lions. Our experts not only help the animals but they also spend a lot of time working within their communities, and particularly with kids, teaching them about wildlife and about minimizing impacts on wild animals and respecting them.

Rep. Smith said today, “Every year, hundreds of thousands of wild animals are orphaned, injured or become sick. This resolution recognizes the work of wildlife rehabilitation centers and their self-less efforts to protect our wildlife. Today, we thank these individuals and organizations for what they do on a daily basis.”

As I travel around the country, I try to visit many of these wildlife rehabilitation centers, where I have been delighted to meet the selfless people providing a remarkable safety net for animals in crisis.  It’s a network of emergency care centers not nearly as numerous and well-funded as the array of dog and cat shelters and centers, but every bit as critical for animals. We join Congressman Smith and other lawmakers in saluting them and their life-saving work today.

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