Breaking news: Taiwan bans the trade in dog and cat meat

By on April 13, 2017 with 2 Comments

This week, our fight against the global dog meat trade got an enormous lift with Taiwan’s legislature amending its anti-cruelty law and banning the trade and the consumption of our best friends.

Taiwan becomes the latest nation in the region to make an emphatic statement and to curb the trade and the first to include a ban on the cat trade. Hong Kong, the Philippines, and Thailand also have dog meat bans in place.

As we’ve seen with our campaigns to pass anti-cruelty laws and anti-animal fighting laws, these efforts build as more jurisdictions come on board. With a population of more than 23 million, Taiwan is no small actor, embracing humane treatment in an emphatic way. Animal-cruelty acts are now punishable by up to two years in prison and a fine of 200,000 to 2 million new Taiwan dollars (about $6,500 to $65,400).

Humane Society International estimates that people kill and consume 30 million dogs a year, almost all of them in Asia. We are campaigning diligently in South Korea—which has thousands of dog meat farms—and in the run-up to the 2018 winter Olympics we are redoubling our efforts in the nation. The world will be horrified to learn of this sordid industry, and we believe South Korean leaders will want to promote a transition of people involved in this business to other trades. What an inspiring story that would be about the power and resolve of this nation to eradicate this anachronism from its 21st century economy. Already, we’ve shut down many dog meat farms across South Korea, helped transition farmers to humane livelihoods, and transported more than 800 dogs to the U.S., Canada, and the United Kingdom for rehabilitation and adoption.

And in China, which is in the process of shutting down its ivory-carving operations, it’s quite possible that the world’s largest nation will also take action to stop this trade. Animal welfare is on the rise, with a domestic movement gaining momentum and focusing a good share of its energy on this very problem. Outlawing dog meat trade has been the subject of legislative proposals submitted to China’s national legislature in the last few years. In 2016, one such legislative proposal was supported by more than 9 million Chinese netizens

We want the U.S. to do exactly what we’re asking of South Korea and China. In the Congress, Representatives Alcee L. Hastings, D-Fla., Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., Dave Trott, R-Mich., and Brendan Boyle, D-Pa., introduced a bill last month to prevent domestic trade and imports of dog meat.

There’s no place for killing dogs in a world that loves them and treats them as family members. Never as food.

Categories
Humane Society International

Subscribe to the Blog

Enter your email address below to receive updates each time we publish new content.

2 Comments

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Debra Grossman says:

    Thank you Taiwan for making the right decision and moving ahead as a Leader and HSUS for all your hard work and courage. I mention courage, because it takes courage to be a witness to the horrific brutalities inflicted on dogs and cats, torturing them before death. Have you made any progress on the methods these dog killers use in places where the fight to end is not over? I have seen some horrible videos; boiling alive, skinning while alive, is there work being done on these barbaric practices? How can any government allow this to happen? Here in US, there are quick methods to end life for animals used for meat and those that violate, are often punished.

  2. Animal Freer says:

    I fear “quick methods” of slaughter may not be quick enough. In Asia dogs and cats are tortured deliberately to improve their flavor apparently.
    In South Korea a US animal charity YT video showed a small dog being partially hanged by its lead from a tree branch. The little dog had wagged its tail earlier thinking it was going out for a walk. Ugh !
    “So far as we know beasts are incapable of sin or virtue; therefore they can neither deserve pain nor be improved by it.” C.S.Lewis, Fellow of Magdalen College Oxford 1940

Share a Comment

The HSUS encourages open discussion, and we invite you to share your opinion on our issues. By participating on this page, you are agreeing to our commenting policy.
Please enter your name and email address below before commenting. Your email address will not be published.

Top