The HSUS goes to federal court on behalf of Yellowstone’s grizzly bears

By on August 29, 2017 with 3 Comments

Sixty days ago, The HSUS told Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke that we’d see him in court if his agency did not reconsider a wrong-headed decision to strip federal protections from grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We made good on that promise today.

Joined by our affiliate The Fund for Animals, The HSUS filed a complaint in the federal court for the District of Montana in Missoula. The complaint alleges multiple violations of the Endangered Species Act and the Administrative Procedure Act – the latter a statute that provides a critical backstop to ensure that federal agency decisions are well-reasoned and that they properly evaluate scientific data.

Litigating this case in Missoula has special significance because it lies within the corridor connecting the two largest remaining grizzly bear populations in the lower 48 states: the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE). Before they were nearly wiped out in the early 20th century, grizzly bears numbered in the tens of thousands and roamed across much of the North American continent. ESA protections beginning in 1975 rescued grizzlies from the precipice of extinction. But the fact is that much work remains. The GYE population still numbers fewer than 700 grizzlies, fragmented populations are disconnected, and staple foods like whitebark pine nuts and cutthroat trout remain in sharp decline. Each of the last two years saw record numbers of bears poached, run over on highways, and killed by state agents in so-called “management actions” as the bears have been forced to range further and further outside Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks in search of food.

There is clear scientific evidence to necessitate maintaining protections and continued federal monitoring for the grizzly bear population. But instead, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has ignored expert data and conducted a tortured statutory analysis to turn over management of bears to states eager to align with the narrow interests of trophy hunters, ranchers, and other consumptive users of our nation’s shared natural resources. Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana have already begun the process of planning trophy-hunting seasons on bears, just as they have done after federal protections for the gray wolf were removed. Now, with federal protections eliminated for the Great Bear and hunting seasons looming, serious-minded scientists honestly wonder whether Yellowstone’s bears will ever again connect with populations in northern Montana and Idaho and establish a viable population of grizzly bears in the United States.

While the decision to strip protections for Yellowstone grizzly bears is rickety as a matter of law and science, it’s also wrong on economics and the values of America’s great majority of citizens. As I’ve argued in this context and others, grizzlies are more valuable alive than dead. They are responsible for bringing in tens of millions of dollars into local economies in and around the Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks. The GYE states, acting through unelected and unaccountable game commissions, are shooting themselves in the foot by ignoring the guides, photographers, hoteliers, and small business people whose livelihoods depend on live grizzlies. Recently, the newly elected government in British Columbia, relying largely on a concern for animal welfare and for the economic health of rural communities, pledged to bar the trophy hunting of grizzly bears in the province by the end of November.

Delisting and trophy hunting this iconic species is more than just an attack on principles of conservation, science-based decision-making, indigenous rights, government accountability, and animal welfare. It’s an assault on one of America’s most iconic species, situated in America’s most storied ecological region. The HSUS is proud to stand with an enormous range of stakeholders to defend the grizzly bear.

Categories
Public Policy (Legal/Legislative), Wildlife/Marine Mammals

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3 Comments

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  1. charlene sousa says:

    get the poaching stop for Bears wolves every Wild creature has a reason to be here a a purpose when one animal becomes extinct another one becomes extinct what is it people are not understanding

  2. Peggy Ellison says:

    I am more than pleased you are taking the plight of the grizzlies. It is so distressing that our government wants to kill our wildlife-the wolves are also in their sights.
    My biggest concern right now, bsides the grizzly bears and wolves, is the fight for the lives of our horses and burros. Could you tell me what is going on with them from your prospective? I call Senators and Assembly members, but hear nothing from them. This makes me very apprehensive. Is the HSUS fighting for them?
    I certainly appreciative the wonderful work you and your organization are doing for all animals.
    Thank you.

  3. Candace Colby says:

    Thank you to HSUS for taking on this issue. It’s shameful that pubic officials seem to consider only the narrow interests of a few selfish individuals when public lands are entrusted to all citizens. With climate change and habitat loss we must do all we can to protect all wild animals until we take serious action to correct these problems.

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