Crouching Tiger, Hidden, Draggin’ Federal Rule?

By on February 9, 2016 with 0 Comments

In addition to the cruelty they spawn, so many animal-use enterprises – from puppy mills to animal fighting operations – pass on costs to the rest of society, including the cost of care for confiscated and discarded animals who need medical attention and lifetime homes. The exotic animal trade is one of the biggest contributors to this problem, churning out animals for the pet trade, use in movies or commercials, and for photo shoots for tourists  For example, it cost The HSUS and its affiliate, The Fund for Animals, hundreds of thousands of dollars to build a new enclosure for three tigers we confiscated in a cruelty case. Why should we have to pay for the reckless actions of people who should never have had these endangered, powerful carnivores in the first place?

Last year, an HSUS undercover investigation of Tiger Safari, a roadside menagerie in rural Oklahoma, exposed tourists physically manhandling baby tigers and the personnel at the facility using harsh methods of discipline and offering up an improper diet that compromised the health of the animals. At these roadside menageries, newborn tiger cubs are yanked away from their mothers immediately after birth in order to draw in paying customers for endless rounds of photo shoots. Tired, overheated, thirsty, hungry, or even sick cubs are required to endure a cascade of people with no experience in handling the animals. When they weren’t being manhandled, the tiger cubs featured in our investigation were relegated to barren cages once they grew too large to be handled, and both died mysteriously before they were one-and-a-half years old. A just-released U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection report cited Tiger Safari for five Animal Welfare Act violations, including three repeat violations.

In 2012, The HSUS and a coalition of animal protection organizations filed a legal petition with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, requesting that the agency issue a rule under the Animal Welfare Act to prohibit public contact with tigers and other dangerous wild animals. This would help end the cycle of unfettered breeding of big cats for the exploitation of their cubs, the resulting surplus of adult big cats, and the animal welfare and public safety implications when large cubs are discarded after ceasing to be profitable—often at the expense of taxpayers, government, and nonprofit organizations. But more than three years later, the agency has failed to act on the petition.

We will continue to push USDA to adopt the public contact rule. In the meantime, there is another federal agency that can make progress for big cats and that action is also overdue. In 2011, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed a rule to increase the agency’s oversight of captive tigers by eliminating the so-called “generic tiger exemption,” which is not unlike the decades-long split-listing of captive chimpanzees that was eliminated recently. Currently, generic tigers (those of unknown or mixed lineage, including thousands of tigers at roadside zoos and private menageries) are not subject to the same permit application and recordkeeping requirements as the approximately 280 tigers managed for genetic diversity by zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. That means people can breed, trade, and otherwise use tigers for whatever purpose they wish and not trigger any federal oversight or even basic recordkeeping for these endangered species.

The trade in tigers is out of control, and there are now immense abuses. Lawmakers from across the political spectrum wrote last summer and earlier this month to the Obama Administration to make rules final. Apparently the roadside menagerie operators are crying foul about this proposed rulemaking action. These are not credible businesses, their reckless behavior places an incredible burden on the rest of society, and they have a documented record of abusing the animals in their care. It’s one thing for tigers to live at AZA-accredited zoological facilities, which have the resources and staff to provide adequate care for them. It’s another matter, however, for private citizens and fly-by-night menageries to breed and trade these animals for display or for the pet trade.

Finalizing the rule would ensure that any person who seeks to breed or engage in interstate commerce in tigers has the resources, capacity, and good faith to actually enhance the survival of endangered tigers, as required by the Endangered Species Act. It is a common-sense measure that will go a long way in ensuring that these beautiful animals are not subjected to unnecessary torment and abuse just so someone can make a fast buck.

Time for the United States to Enact a Federal Anti-Cruelty Statute

By on February 8, 2016 with 2 Comments
Time for the United States to Enact a Federal Anti-Cruelty Statute

In May 2015, in Temecula, California, a U.S. Marine couple living at Camp Pendleton were accused of shattering their dog’s legs and binding his mouth with rubber bands for days. In a case like this the state can prosecute under its anti-cruelty statute, but given that the practice occurred on a U.S. military installation, it might . . . 

Read More »

Federal Lands Belong to All of Us – Whether In Oregon, Alaska, or Elsewhere

By on February 5, 2016 with 5 Comments
Federal Lands Belong to All of Us – Whether In Oregon, Alaska, or Elsewhere

Something very anti-American has been happening in our nation. The bonds that have traditionally held us together are popping loose here and there. To my way of thinking, not enough of us – particularly those who claim social leadership – have been speaking out in alarm. I’d like to. I’m referring to the foundational covenants of . . . 

Read More »

How Has Ohio Become a Cockfighting Capital?

By on February 4, 2016 with 2 Comments
How Has Ohio Become a Cockfighting Capital?

Two recent incidents in Youngstown, Ohio, provide more evidence of how rampant cockfighting is in the state. Despite an agreement reached between The HSUS, the Ohio Farm Bureau, and the Ohio Poultry Association in 2010 to strengthen the state’s anti-cockfighting law, a handful of lawmakers have thwarted progress on legislation, leaving Ohio with one of the . . . 

Read More »

Slaying of Cecil Haunts Safari Club, as Group Gathers in Vegas

By on February 3, 2016 with 19 Comments
Slaying of Cecil Haunts Safari Club, as Group Gathers in Vegas

For years, the trophy-hunting crowd has treated the world as its playground. They’ve viewed rare creatures as collectibles, assuming that lavish spending on guides, outfitters, and foreign governments entitled them to do as they please in shooting up wildlife. This week, members of Safari Club International — the Arizona-based group that promotes competitive trophy-hunting activities across . . . 

Read More »

USDA Lab Results Show Horse Soring Crowd Looks More Than Ever Like Organized Criminals

By on February 2, 2016 with 13 Comments
USDA Lab Results Show Horse Soring Crowd Looks More Than Ever Like Organized Criminals

Trainers and owners in the “Big Lick” segment of the Tennessee Walking horse show world are addicted to injuring horses and breaking federal and state laws against animal cruelty in order to win ribbons at major horse shows. For evidence of that, look no further than the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s latest test results from . . . 

Read More »

Super Sonic Progress on Animal Welfare, Even as Trade Groups Dig In

By on February 1, 2016 with 1 Comment
Super Sonic Progress on Animal Welfare, Even as Trade Groups Dig In

Today, several of America’s biggest food retailers, including Sonic, a national fast-food chain based in Oklahoma City, announced new policies to make all eggs in their supply chain cage-free. It’s part of a corporate revolution that is rejecting extreme confinement of farm animals and embracing animal welfare reforms. Since last September, our cage-free campaign has made . . . 

Read More »

Breaking news: Captive Orcas, Dolphins to Get New Federal Protections

By on January 29, 2016 with 17 Comments
Breaking news: Captive Orcas, Dolphins to Get New Federal Protections

Today, after a two-decade wait, we celebrate the release of a proposed federal rule from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to improve standards for the handling, care, and housing of captive marine mammals, mainly at aquariums and marine parks. It is an important animal welfare step, at a time when the nation is questioning . . . 

Read More »

Furry Celebs in the Spotlight for National Campaign to Promote Pet Adoption

By on January 29, 2016 with 2 Comments
Furry Celebs in the Spotlight for National Campaign to Promote Pet Adoption

You’ve probably gotten at least a glimpse of these Internet celebrities in viral videos or social media feeds: Toast Meets World, a toothless King Charles puppy mill rescue who has 342,000 Instagram followers; Bento the Keyboard Cat, who plays that electronic instrument not quite as well as Elton John; and Hamilton Pug, who went from . . . 

Read More »

‘Judge Me by the Enemies I Have Made’

By on January 28, 2016 with 7 Comments
‘Judge Me by the Enemies I Have Made’

More than anything, The HSUS is about one purpose: making tangible progress to stop animal cruelty. Our determined work for all animals wins us millions of supporters. But it also stirs the passions and fears of special interests and individuals who make a profit or get a thrill from hurting animals. Cockfighters and dogfighters, hunters of . . . 

Read More »

Top