Former U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson joins fight to save New York Blood Center chimps

By on September 27, 2016 with 0 Comments

I was so pleased to be joined by former New Mexico governor and United Nations ambassador Bill Richardson today in a mid-morning press conference to announce a collaborative campaign to secure a safe future for dozens of laboratory chimpanzees abandoned by the New York Blood Center on a set of islands in Liberia.

The Richardson Center for Global Engagement, led by one of the best-known negotiators in the world, is committed to holding the Blood Center accountable for its responsibility to chimpanzees but also to provide support for proper sanctuary of the beleaguered chimps until that responsibility is reclaimed. It was in March 2015 that the Blood Center, a charity with at least $400 million in assets, left more than 60 chimpanzees for dead. The abandonment happened at the worst possible time, during an Ebola crisis that consumed the attention of the government of Liberia and public-health advocates throughout the world, and in a habitat without sufficient food or water.

Gov. Richardson has emerged as a leader in the animal protection movement, and one of his signature achievements was triggering the campaign to end the use of chimpanzees in invasive experiments in the United States and retire them from U.S. laboratories to sanctuaries (I wrote about his decisive role in The Humane Economy). We’ve seen game-changing progress on both those fronts—with invasive chimpanzee research effectively ending in the United States last year and a current focus on moving hundreds of chimpanzees to sanctuary. We’re so pleased to now have the governor’s support on our work to help the abandoned chimpanzees in Liberia, marking an expansion of his concern about chimps to the global arena.

As readers of this blog know, New York Blood Center is still refusing to accept financial responsibility for the chimpanzees it exploited for years, despite immense pressure to do so. The Blood Center recently rejected our generous offer to run all operations and provide significant financial assistance for a problem that they created (instead, they offered to provide only a small fraction–less than five percent — of what it will cost to care for these animals over their lifetimes.) The Blood Center has since claimed it is willing to work with “other” organizations to find a solution for the chimpanzees. But this is a talking point and a hollow answer, since there are no groups waiting who have the resources and expertise to spend millions to care for chimps that the Blood Center put into this circumstance.

As part of our new phase in pressuring the Blood Center, Gov. Richardson and I recently sent a joint letter to nearly 90 of the Blood Center’s most significant organizational donors, urging them to join MetLife and Citigroup in saying they won’t support the charity until it fulfills its animal welfare responsibilities. We’ve already heard from the head of Xerox Foundation who called the situation “deplorable.” The HSUS has reached out to several of these organizations in the past—including large multinationals such as IBM and Johnson & Johnson and local, New York based foundations like the New York Community Trust—and we eagerly await their response. These companies risk their own reputation by continuing a business-as-usual relationship with the Blood Center, given its reckless course of action.

Thanks to dedicated donors, staff, volunteers, and the support of the government of Liberia, we’ve been able to stabilize the situation for the chimpanzees. And while we will continue to pressure the Blood Center, we cannot wait any longer to begin the next phase of planning for the long-term care of the chimpanzees in Liberia. The Richardson Center is generously providing support to help us get this effort off the ground. Continuing to work closely with the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research and agencies within the government of Liberia will also be a critical part of this effort. We hope to partner with these institutions to create a sanctuary that meets high accreditation standards, similar to others in Africa and the United States.

The establishment of a high quality chimpanzee sanctuary—which would be the first ever in Liberia—will help not only the chimpanzees abandoned by the Blood Center, but also other animals in the country who are victims of the bush meat and pet trades. Well-run sanctuaries also have the added benefits of promoting wildlife conservation through the support of law enforcement, education, and public awareness campaigns, and providing opportunities for local communities through capacity building, employment, and tourism.

It’s great to have Governor Richardson on our side, and active. We are honored to work with him, and we know he’s now poised to add to his record of accomplishments for animals. We will keep you updated on our progress and hope we can count on you to help us in our efforts to give these chimpanzees the life they deserve, and to ensure that the Blood Center plays a significant financial role in making it a reality.

Help the abandoned chimpanzees in Liberia »

A stay of execution for 31 more dogs from South Korea

By on September 26, 2016 with 2 Comments
A stay of execution for 31 more dogs from South Korea

Humane Society International’s campaign to stop the slaughter of dogs for meat is unremitting, and today we are announcing that 31 dogs on the verge of being butchered after living on a South Korean dog meat farm are bound for the United States. The dogs arriving today came from an unlicensed and therefore illegal backyard . . . 

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So much at stake as 183 nations gather to address wildlife trade

By on September 23, 2016 with 2 Comments
So much at stake as 183 nations gather to address wildlife trade

Governments play a big part in combating the legal and illegal international trade in wildlife. This Saturday, a United Nations conference, known as CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), will begin its deliberations and consider proposals at a two-week meeting in Johannesburg, South Africa. Over 3,000 delegates . . . 

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The long march to secure a strong legal framework for animal protection

By on September 22, 2016 with 3 Comments
The long march to secure a strong legal framework for animal protection

Today, Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Penn., tried to pass the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture (PACT) Act, S. 1831, on the Senate floor. He was pitch-perfect in making the case for the enactment of a federal anti-cruelty statute to punish people who do the worst things to animals on federal property or in relation to interstate . . . 

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Court affirms European ban on cruel cosmetics

By on September 21, 2016 with 4 Comments
Court affirms European ban on cruel cosmetics

Blinding, poisoning, and killing animals in the name of beauty has never stood a chance in the court of public opinion. But it’s survived for too long as a legal enterprise because industry has thwarted reform with pretenses about the lack of alternatives, and politicians have sidestepped our moral duty to innocent creatures. However, the . . . 

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States, corporations acting to end extreme confinement of animals on industrial farms

By on September 20, 2016 with 1 Comment
States, corporations acting to end extreme confinement of animals on industrial farms

Today, my colleague Paul Shapiro participated in a debate sponsored by WBUR, The Boston Globe, and UMass Boston about Question 3 – the statewide ballot measure in the Commonwealth that bans cage confinement of veal calves, breeding sows, and laying hens, and also stipulates that selling animal products from immobilizing cages and crates won’t be . . . 

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BLM chief says no mass killing for our American wild horses and burros

By on September 19, 2016 with 28 Comments
BLM chief says no mass killing for our American wild horses and burros

The Bureau of Land Management put many people at ease when it declared it would reject the recommendation made last week by the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board to euthanize up to 45,000 wild horses and burros in government-funded holding facilities. This recommendation of the nine-person advisory group was both a provocation and . . . 

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Breaking news: U.S. Senate clears bill to curb wildlife trafficking

By on September 16, 2016 with 2 Comments
Breaking news: U.S. Senate clears bill to curb wildlife trafficking

Last night, the U.S. Senate acted to curb wildlife trafficking when it passed the Eliminate, Neutralize, and Disrupt (END) Wildlife Trafficking Act (H.R. 2494), sending it back to the House for final action. This bipartisan legislation, which was championed by Sens. Chris Coons, D-Del., and Jeff Flake R-Ariz., provides tools and resources necessary to combat . . . 

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The Compass is set for cage-free

By on September 15, 2016 with 1 Comment
The Compass is set for cage-free

Today, Compass Group, the world’s largest food service provider, announced it will switch all the eggs it uses – both liquid and shell – to cage-free for all of its global operations in 50 countries. The announcement will move millions of hens out of battery cages and into cage-free environments, and it’s the latest big . . . 

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Putting a stake in the ground for animals in Puerto Rico

By on September 14, 2016 with 3 Comments
Putting a stake in the ground for animals in Puerto Rico

In 2015, The HSUS, Humane Society International, and the Government of Puerto Rico announced a comprehensive partnership involving governmental agencies, all 78 provincial mayors, and other stakeholders, to transform animal welfare on the island. The partnership covers specialized training for law enforcement officials, animal control agents, social workers, and teachers as a way of dealing . . . 

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